Month: January 2019

Onboarding A New Employee? Follow These 11 Effective Strategies

Onboarding new hires is a crucial—and sometimes regularly repeated—process for businesses. Not having a concrete training plan in place can cause anxiety and confusion for both the incoming employees and those tasked with training them. You not only need to be sure you don’t overwhelm new team members in their first days, but also that you give them all the information they need—including the “small, everyday” details that can sometimes be taken for granted.

If you want your new team members to receive the best grounding for their roles, but you don’t want to sidetrack seasoned employees with complicated and repetitive training stints, you need to develop effective and efficient onboarding processes. According to members of Forbes Coaches Council, here are some aspects of your business that must be covered by a good training program, as well as strategies you can use to effectively and efficiently onboard your new team members.

14 Things You Should Never, Ever Say In A Job Interview

It’s always intimidating to interview for a new job, whether you’re fresh out of university and eager to break into your industry or a veteran looking to transition to a new company. As best practices, new technologies and expectations shift within industries at an ever-faster rate, it can be a challenge to present yourself in the best way for each interview.

That being said, there are just some things a job seeker should never say in an interview. To help job candidates avoid making a slip-up, 15 members of Forbes Coaches Council share their advice on the one thing you should never say during a job interview.

Do Recruiters Need a Code of Ethics?

Low-level recruiting jobs can be among the toughest in HR. Practitioners are under extreme pressure to fill clients’ positions. That pressure can tempt recruiters to make some less-than-ethical choices.

Occasionally, recruiters charge job-seekers for their services. Some mislead applicants about openings or about their chances of getting a job. They might post fake job descriptions or fabricate a relationship with an employer. Some recruiters misuse applicants’ personal information.