Author: Stacey A. Gordon

Onboarding A New Employee? Follow These 11 Effective Strategies

Onboarding new hires is a crucial—and sometimes regularly repeated—process for businesses. Not having a concrete training plan in place can cause anxiety and confusion for both the incoming employees and those tasked with training them. You not only need to be sure you don’t overwhelm new team members in their first days, but also that you give them all the information they need—including the “small, everyday” details that can sometimes be taken for granted.

If you want your new team members to receive the best grounding for their roles, but you don’t want to sidetrack seasoned employees with complicated and repetitive training stints, you need to develop effective and efficient onboarding processes. According to members of Forbes Coaches Council, here are some aspects of your business that must be covered by a good training program, as well as strategies you can use to effectively and efficiently onboard your new team members.

14 Things You Should Never, Ever Say In A Job Interview

It’s always intimidating to interview for a new job, whether you’re fresh out of university and eager to break into your industry or a veteran looking to transition to a new company. As best practices, new technologies and expectations shift within industries at an ever-faster rate, it can be a challenge to present yourself in the best way for each interview.

That being said, there are just some things a job seeker should never say in an interview. To help job candidates avoid making a slip-up, 15 members of Forbes Coaches Council share their advice on the one thing you should never say during a job interview.

Do Recruiters Need a Code of Ethics?

Low-level recruiting jobs can be among the toughest in HR. Practitioners are under extreme pressure to fill clients’ positions. That pressure can tempt recruiters to make some less-than-ethical choices.

Occasionally, recruiters charge job-seekers for their services. Some mislead applicants about openings or about their chances of getting a job. They might post fake job descriptions or fabricate a relationship with an employer. Some recruiters misuse applicants’ personal information.

How to know when a seemingly great opportunity isn’t right for you

Your boss announced that the company is promoting you, which comes with an impressive new title and a big jump in salary. You accept without thinking about it, because it would be stupid to turn down a promotion, right?

Not necessarily. On its face, it might seem strange to even think about turning down the chance to move up in an organization. But you shouldn’t assume that what looks like the right decision to someone else is the correct decision for you. Here’s what you should consider when you find yourself questioning whether or not to say yes or no to a seemingly “great” opportunity.

Diversity Isn’t A Thing, It’s An Action

Last month, I attended the Association for Talent Development International Conference and Exhibition. I wasn’t managing the conference or its speakers as I’ve done for several conferences over the last eight years, nor was I even speaking or coaching professionals. I was an attendee, which allowed me to soak up the knowledge and work on my own professional learning and development.

As I listened to two of the keynote speakers, Barack Obama and Marcus Buckingham, I noticed common themes. Prefacing them was an introduction by chairwoman Tara Deakin, whose words struck me as insightful and sparked my idea for this article.

Hate Your Job? Here’s a 4-Step Plan That’ll Get You Out of There

It’s Sunday night and once again you find yourself dreading the upcoming start of the workweek. You know your company is all wrong for you, but you’re not sure if there’s anything better out there. At the time you accepted it’d sounded like a good offer, but now you’re stuck in a position you hate.

Even though you’re not happy, you’re hesitating to actually do something about it, because—let’s admit it—leaving a secure job is scary. Instead of taking a leap, maybe you’ll just wait it out: Something else will come along soon, right?

It might, but it might not, and the only way to know for sure that a more satisfying job is in your future is to be the one driving the change. Here’s how to go about that:

From Diversity to Inclusion: Three Strategies to Become an Employer of Choice

I recently saw the movie Black Panther along with millions of other people, and I came to the conclusion that many of them did: Women, and in this case, black women, are strong, wise and not to be messed with. So why does it seem like Corporate America is missing the memo?

Three Ways to Succeed in Hiring a More Diverse Workforce

Misguided and culturally insensitive blunders such as the racially insensitive Pepsi commercial with Kendall Jenner, Google’s disgruntled engineer intensifying male tech industry bias, the egregious casting decision in the movie Ghost in the Shell with whites playing Asians, and the complexity of L’Oréal firing a transgender black woman after her comments about race—all of these highlight the need for companies to incorporate diversity into their conversations at work.

A recent financial study of 1,000 large companies by McKinsey & Co. found that the more diverse the management, the higher the profits, compared with companies composed of less diversity. Companies in the top 25% with the most ethnic executives outperformed other firms with profits 33% higher than those in the bottom 25% with fewer ethnic workers. Firms more inclusive of women in management showed 21% more revenue than those with fewer women in executive roles.

Pitting Inclusion Against Diversity

Deloitte has made the decision to phase out employee resource groups over the next 18 months. As you read that sentence, you’re probably wondering: “What’s the big deal?”

It’s a move that doesn’t only affect its nearly 250,000 employees worldwide. It potentially affects hundreds of thousands of employees outside of Deloitte because of its reputation as a company that knows what it’s doing when it comes to diversity. Deloitte has been, according to the press release, “a recognized pioneer in female promotion and social inclusion initiatives” and a DiversityInc Top 10 Company for Global Diversity. So now that it’s done something that pulls the foundation out from under the building blocks of diversity, I wonder what to do about it.

Grow Your Business with Diversity and Inclusion

Having diverse workers leads to greater success—but how can you attract and retain them?

Diversity in the workplace can always be improved—and it should, if only because it makes business sense. Having a diverse workforce can improve not only profitability, but innovation, customer relationships and employee retention.

According to a report by McKinsey & Company, a company with diverse employees is more likely to be more profitable and successful than those with less diversity. Specifically, a company is 15 percent more likely to turn a profit above the national average if a company has gender diversity, and 35 percent more likely if a company has racial and ethnic diversity. “The reason for that is because of the diversity of thought and ideas that comes from the diversity of experiences that people have,” explains Stacey Gordon, chief human capital consultant at training and consulting organization Rework Work.

John Iino, chief diversity officer at law firm Reed Smith, states that putting an emphasis on greater diversity and inclusion has directly benefited them. “[Diversity] really lends itself to better relationships with clients because you have some common values,” he shares. As the world becomes more interconnected, issues of diversity rise to the forefront, and many companies are taking note. “We see so many of our clients supporting and embracing diversity,” Iino adds. “We’re able to make stronger connections with them—that’s obviously important as a business.”

 

Stay Connected!

Join Rework's community to receive our Simply Good resource (a monthly dose of only good news) as well as opportunities to deepen your diversity, inclusion, and belonging skills and awareness. We can't wait to share with you!

You have Successfully Subscribed!