Category: Expertly Speaking

The 10 Most Popular Courses Job Seekers Need to Watch

Looking for a new job during the pandemic can feel like a massive undertaking. We want to lighten the load. If you’re on the hunt for a new job, this list is for you. 

While typical skills like resume building and personal branding appear on this year’s list, those skills are not the ones topping the charts. Professionals looking for a job are watching courses that focus on skills like Strategic Thinking (#1 on the list), as well as Python, project management, and Excel—hard skills that are still essential in our new world of work.

Use our list of most-watched courses among job seekers to prioritize what you’re learning today and stand out in a tough job market. You can watch them for free until September 30, 2020. 


8. Writing a Resume

Instructor: Stacey A. Gordon

Course description: Finding a great job starts with writing a great resume that speaks to your personal and professional strengths. This course provides guidance on every aspect of writing a resume, and also offers a few extra job search tips such as identifying companies to work for and determining fit. 

Methodology: Based on global data from the LinkedIn Learning platform from July 1, 2019 through June 30 2020, among members identified as job seekers. Top courses are based on the number of unique learners.

View the full list on the LinkedIn Learning blog.

Diversity efforts have become formulaic over the years. Where is leadership missing the mark?

In the best cases, companies hire a diversity leader, afford the person no power or resources, and expect miracles. This knee-jerk reaction is both careless and, looking at the landscape today, makes little difference, says this D&I strategist.

Over three weeks ago, when we watched George Floyd with a knee on his neck, the video should have been shocking, appalling, angering, and many other adjectives to everyone, myself included. But yet, when countless white friends reached out to me to ask how I was feeling, my answer was simply, “I’m fine.”

Today is no different than any other day; I went to sleep Black, I woke up Black, and the day that George Floyd was killed was no different to me than last Tuesday or every other Friday. The difference is that my friends, and people around the world, finally noticed.

Nothing has changed—at least yet. And whether I put a period after “Nothing has changed” is up to us and the actions we take in the future.

Great Cultures Begin With Authentic Leaders

When you think back to the influential leaders in your life, what attributes did they have that stand out in your memory? Were they ethical and transparent? Did you trust them? Did they have a good sense of their own skills and opportunities for improvement? If so, you likely experienced authentic leadership.

Authentic leadership is more than a corporate buzzword. When an organization has an authentic leader at the helm, employee engagement improves, job stress decreases, productivity skyrockets, work culture improves and more. The Harvard Business Review found that 75% of employees want to experience more authenticity at work. Authentic leadership is crucial in cultivating a great culture and recruiting a diverse workforce.

Managers, here’s how you deal with negative employees

You’ve seen it happen before: One of your direct reports has suddenly (or maybe not so suddenly) become a nuisance. In meetings, they’re rejecting good ideas and putting down bad ones. Or they’re constantly complaining about their work or someone else or some company initiative. Or they never seem to see the positive in what you’re working on as a team.

“I like to call these people the ‘Naysayers,’” says Melody Wilding, a licensed social worker, professor of human behavior at Hunter College, and performance and career coach on The Muse. “That person who always pokes holes in everything, always kind of has a bad attitude, and points out why things are not going to work.”

Everyone’s crossed paths with a negative employee–someone who always seems to be in a bad mood, who’s not being productive, and who’s difficult to work with, whether because they say no to everything or because their pessimism brings down everyone around them.

This kind of attitude can be disruptive and destructive for any team dynamic, affecting how the person’s co-workers stay focused, motivated, and happy at work. Plus, it doesn’t exactly help with getting stuff done, either.

It can be incredibly infuriating to manage a negative employee’s behavior–and as their boss, you may have the urge to let it go and hope the person just quits, or the situation eventually gets better on its own. But trust me, it won’t.

So how can you handle this type of person calmly and professionally? Here’s what the experts have to say about dealing with negative employees.

How to Deal as a Manager When Someone on Your Team Is Super Negative

You’ve seen it happen before: One of your direct reports has suddenly (or maybe not so suddenly) become a nuisance. In meetings, they’re rejecting good ideas and putting down bad ones. Or they’re constantly complaining about their work or someone else or some company initiative. Or they never seem to see the positive in what you’re working on as a team.

Onboarding A New Employee? Follow These 11 Effective Strategies

Onboarding new hires is a crucial—and sometimes regularly repeated—process for businesses. Not having a concrete training plan in place can cause anxiety and confusion for both the incoming employees and those tasked with training them. You not only need to be sure you don’t overwhelm new team members in their first days, but also that you give them all the information they need—including the “small, everyday” details that can sometimes be taken for granted.

If you want your new team members to receive the best grounding for their roles, but you don’t want to sidetrack seasoned employees with complicated and repetitive training stints, you need to develop effective and efficient onboarding processes. According to members of Forbes Coaches Council, here are some aspects of your business that must be covered by a good training program, as well as strategies you can use to effectively and efficiently onboard your new team members.

14 Things You Should Never, Ever Say In A Job Interview

It’s always intimidating to interview for a new job, whether you’re fresh out of university and eager to break into your industry or a veteran looking to transition to a new company. As best practices, new technologies and expectations shift within industries at an ever-faster rate, it can be a challenge to present yourself in the best way for each interview.

That being said, there are just some things a job seeker should never say in an interview. To help job candidates avoid making a slip-up, 15 members of Forbes Coaches Council share their advice on the one thing you should never say during a job interview.

Do Recruiters Need a Code of Ethics?

Low-level recruiting jobs can be among the toughest in HR. Practitioners are under extreme pressure to fill clients’ positions. That pressure can tempt recruiters to make some less-than-ethical choices.

Occasionally, recruiters charge job-seekers for their services. Some mislead applicants about openings or about their chances of getting a job. They might post fake job descriptions or fabricate a relationship with an employer. Some recruiters misuse applicants’ personal information.

How to know when a seemingly great opportunity isn’t right for you

Your boss announced that the company is promoting you, which comes with an impressive new title and a big jump in salary. You accept without thinking about it, because it would be stupid to turn down a promotion, right?

Not necessarily. On its face, it might seem strange to even think about turning down the chance to move up in an organization. But you shouldn’t assume that what looks like the right decision to someone else is the correct decision for you. Here’s what you should consider when you find yourself questioning whether or not to say yes or no to a seemingly “great” opportunity.

Diversity Isn’t A Thing, It’s An Action

Last month, I attended the Association for Talent Development International Conference and Exhibition. I wasn’t managing the conference or its speakers as I’ve done for several conferences over the last eight years, nor was I even speaking or coaching professionals. I was an attendee, which allowed me to soak up the knowledge and work on my own professional learning and development.

As I listened to two of the keynote speakers, Barack Obama and Marcus Buckingham, I noticed common themes. Prefacing them was an introduction by chairwoman Tara Deakin, whose words struck me as insightful and sparked my idea for this article.