Tag: Career

Stacey A. Gordon Talks With Erica Moore-Burton, Esq.

This week I had the chance to talk with Erica Moore-Burton, Esq., founder of Round Hill Legal Search, a Los Angeles legal services placement firm. For more than 16 years, Erica and her team have connected a vast network of legal firms with highly-qualified candidates to fill a wide range of legal positions.

In this video, Erica discusses the specific challenges that underrepresented minorities, especially women of color, face in the legal services industry. She also provides a fresh and innovative approach to the interview process, one that enables candidates to present their best selves without battling misconceptions before they even sit down.

Many firms are looking more closely at their employment metrics and how to retain diverse individuals, but the work of increasing awareness and changing perspectives is ongoing. I believe that there’s something different about the current environment, that the call for diversity and inclusion is resonating more than before. When people look back on this moment in history, what will they say about your company’s response?

Stacey A. Gordon Talks With Guest Niani Tolbert

Recently I had the opportunity to chat with Niani Tolbert, founder of the Hire Black initiative. What started as a Juneteenth commitment to provide resume review sessions for 19 black women has quickly evolved into large-scale allyship development among hundreds of recruiters and thousands of applicants. 

At this point in our history, companies are earnestly taking a hard look at their processes to identify where systematic exclusion is present. In this video, Niani provides practical ideas that recruiters and interviewers can implement TODAY to amplify diversity and inclusion in their hiring processes.

Niani also makes an exciting, first-time announcement in regards to the future of the Hire Black initiative!

How to know when a seemingly great opportunity isn’t right for you

Your boss announced that the company is promoting you, which comes with an impressive new title and a big jump in salary. You accept without thinking about it, because it would be stupid to turn down a promotion, right?

Not necessarily. On its face, it might seem strange to even think about turning down the chance to move up in an organization. But you shouldn’t assume that what looks like the right decision to someone else is the correct decision for you. Here’s what you should consider when you find yourself questioning whether or not to say yes or no to a seemingly “great” opportunity.

Hate Your Job? Here’s a 4-Step Plan That’ll Get You Out of There

It’s Sunday night and once again you find yourself dreading the upcoming start of the workweek. You know your company is all wrong for you, but you’re not sure if there’s anything better out there. At the time you accepted it’d sounded like a good offer, but now you’re stuck in a position you hate.

Even though you’re not happy, you’re hesitating to actually do something about it, because—let’s admit it—leaving a secure job is scary. Instead of taking a leap, maybe you’ll just wait it out: Something else will come along soon, right?

It might, but it might not, and the only way to know for sure that a more satisfying job is in your future is to be the one driving the change. Here’s how to go about that:

Hiring for Skills? A Novel Concept Indeed.

Microsoft announced they are working to accelerate a “skills-based labor market” and immediately I wondered what companies have been hiring for previously, if not for skills. I’m sure those of you who have applied for a job again and again, only to be rejected or ignored, have wondered the same thing. 

The New York Times reporting of the subject clarifies that in this ‘new’ way of looking at job applicants, “skills can be emphasized over traditional hiring filters like college degrees, work history and personal references.” From a recruiting perspective, I still believe in personal references because hearing first-hand from someone who has witnessed or benefited from your skills is extremely valuable when evaluating a candidate.