Tag: Culture

Stacey Talks Political Correctness with LaVada English

LaVada English and I took time this week to have a comfortable conversation about uncomfortable conversations. LaVada is the owner of L English Consulting, a coaching and consulting firm that helps organizations develop cultural transformation strategies. In this episode, LaVada and I talk about political correctness, the power of the media, and how organizations can approach real change to build a legacy worth leaving.

In the current climate, honest discussions about race and diversity are being quickly dismissed for fear of “getting too political.” However, these issues are not of a political nature, but a human one. LaVada delves into how the media not only propagates this divide, but also intentionally uses it to deflect focus from the real issues. We also exchange ideas about how to develop a questioning attitude when it comes to what we see, enabling us to, “think above the fray.”

Finally, we talk diversity and inclusion in the workplace, highlighting key questions that organizational leaders should ask themselves long before bringing in a D&I consultant, and why it’s important to know and understand our country’s history with racism. As 2020 finds us repeating behaviors and responses from the 1960s, LaVada calls us to the mat with this challenge: Are we going to allow ourselves to go back to sleep when we have an opportunity to seek greater understanding?

Onboarding A New Employee? Follow These 11 Effective Strategies

Onboarding new hires is a crucial—and sometimes regularly repeated—process for businesses. Not having a concrete training plan in place can cause anxiety and confusion for both the incoming employees and those tasked with training them. You not only need to be sure you don’t overwhelm new team members in their first days, but also that you give them all the information they need—including the “small, everyday” details that can sometimes be taken for granted.

If you want your new team members to receive the best grounding for their roles, but you don’t want to sidetrack seasoned employees with complicated and repetitive training stints, you need to develop effective and efficient onboarding processes. According to members of Forbes Coaches Council, here are some aspects of your business that must be covered by a good training program, as well as strategies you can use to effectively and efficiently onboard your new team members.

Do Recruiters Need a Code of Ethics?

Low-level recruiting jobs can be among the toughest in HR. Practitioners are under extreme pressure to fill clients’ positions. That pressure can tempt recruiters to make some less-than-ethical choices.

Occasionally, recruiters charge job-seekers for their services. Some mislead applicants about openings or about their chances of getting a job. They might post fake job descriptions or fabricate a relationship with an employer. Some recruiters misuse applicants’ personal information.

Three Ways to Succeed in Hiring a More Diverse Workforce

Misguided and culturally insensitive blunders such as the racially insensitive Pepsi commercial with Kendall Jenner, Google’s disgruntled engineer intensifying male tech industry bias, the egregious casting decision in the movie Ghost in the Shell with whites playing Asians, and the complexity of L’Oréal firing a transgender black woman after her comments about race—all of these highlight the need for companies to incorporate diversity into their conversations at work.

A recent financial study of 1,000 large companies by McKinsey & Co. found that the more diverse the management, the higher the profits, compared with companies composed of less diversity. Companies in the top 25% with the most ethnic executives outperformed other firms with profits 33% higher than those in the bottom 25% with fewer ethnic workers. Firms more inclusive of women in management showed 21% more revenue than those with fewer women in executive roles.

Pitting Inclusion Against Diversity

Deloitte has made the decision to phase out employee resource groups over the next 18 months. As you read that sentence, you’re probably wondering: “What’s the big deal?”

It’s a move that doesn’t only affect its nearly 250,000 employees worldwide. It potentially affects hundreds of thousands of employees outside of Deloitte because of its reputation as a company that knows what it’s doing when it comes to diversity. Deloitte has been, according to the press release, “a recognized pioneer in female promotion and social inclusion initiatives” and a DiversityInc Top 10 Company for Global Diversity. So now that it’s done something that pulls the foundation out from under the building blocks of diversity, I wonder what to do about it.

Google’s Diversity Memo Crisis: Why all facts matter

You don’t have to put dirt in your mouth to know it tastes bad – some things you just know. Or you are at least willing to trust the experience of others who have tried it. I treated the #GoogleManifesto in the same way at first. I didn’t need to read a long, rambling document to know that it’s contents are not good. But I did need to read it to provide a perspective on what to do about it. (Sigh – sometimes work is hard.)

The questions I’ve heard that people want answers to are:

  • What does Google do about it? 
  • Is this a sign that others at Google feel the same?
  • Does all of Silicon Valley also agree?

A Simple Solution to Diversity: Start with People

LinkedIn recently asked CEO’s to share insights about diversity and it brought me back to a discussion I had with the Los Angeles Business Journal when I was asked to join their inaugural Diversity & Inclusion Summit happening next month. We discussed the fact that many companies know they need to do something about diversity but they don’t know what that something is. And they don’t know how to begin. 

And that is how initiatives like blind hiring get started. Blind hiring is the attempt to counter the phenomena of hiring managers and recruiters choosing candidates with a similar demographic background as their own by removing identify information like the candidate’s name and education background or conducting anonymous interviews through voice-masking technology.