Tag: Diversity

Rework Work Launches New DEI Tool

We at Rework Work have been diligently working to develop a tool to help companies assess where they are in terms of cultivating a diverse and inclusive workplace. I am so excited to introduce you to the final product of those efforts: the Unbias Blueprint.

In this brief video, I explain the four-phase framework of this assessment tool, which will not only help your company identify its weaknesses in the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) arena, but also how and when to start remediation of those weaknesses. I also share upcoming opportunities to learn more about DEI initiatives and how to move your company from awareness to advocacy.

Let our Unbias Blueprint help you embed DEI into your company’s DNA.

Simply Good: Celebrating Diversity in September

Rosh Hashanah, or the Jewish New Year, is considered one of the holiest days in the Jewish culture. Meaning “head of the year,” Rosh Hashanah commemorates God’s creation of the world and marks the beginning of the Days of Awe, a 10-day period of reflection and repentance that culminates in Yom Kippur, also known as the Day of Atonement.

These “High Holy Days” are steeped in symbolic elements and rituals that go all the way back to the time of Moses. The more I learn about these traditions the more I see their relevance, even for those of us who aren’t Jewish. Who wouldn’t benefit from intentionally setting aside time to be grateful, reflective and to make amends where we need to?

September is also Hispanic Heritage Month, a commemoration established in 1988 to celebrate the history and influence of Hispanic Americans. Although events and festivities will look different this year, many places across the nation (and even the world) have developed creative and engaging ways to pay tribute to Hispanic culture.

We hope that you enjoy this month’s selection of articles. By growing in our understanding and appreciation of these diverse cultures, we are given an opportunity to see the world in a new way. With all that 2020 has brought us thus far, who couldn’t use a fresh set of lenses?

Stacey A. Gordon Talks Diversity, Inclusion and Careers With Creighton Taylor

This week I was joined by Creighton Taylor, founder and CEO of Guided Compass, a technology platform that he fondly refers to as “eHarmony for students and employers.”

Creighton and the Guided Compass team have developed a systematic approach that matches students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds with resources, tools, and opportunities in a vast array of industries. 

Never before has there been a better time for people to make their own path. Unfortunately, issues of access still create a chasm between individuals and the means to do just that. In this interview, Creighton and I discuss how Guided Compass and other organizations are working to bridge that gap by providing tools and resources (often free or low-cost) to help people upskill and enter the career path of their choosing. 

Creighton also shares a practical experiment that he believes will not only help companies understand the foundational benefits of a diverse workforce, but will also provide valuable data that helps other businesses and industries move forward in developing a culture of trust and inclusion in their own workplaces.

Stacey A. Gordon Talks With Erica Moore-Burton, Esq.

This week I had the chance to talk with Erica Moore-Burton, Esq., founder of Round Hill Legal Search, a Los Angeles legal services placement firm. For more than 16 years, Erica and her team have connected a vast network of legal firms with highly-qualified candidates to fill a wide range of legal positions.

In this video, Erica discusses the specific challenges that underrepresented minorities, especially women of color, face in the legal services industry. She also provides a fresh and innovative approach to the interview process, one that enables candidates to present their best selves without battling misconceptions before they even sit down.

Many firms are looking more closely at their employment metrics and how to retain diverse individuals, but the work of increasing awareness and changing perspectives is ongoing. I believe that there’s something different about the current environment, that the call for diversity and inclusion is resonating more than before. When people look back on this moment in history, what will they say about your company’s response?

Stacey A. Gordon Talks With Guest Niani Tolbert

Recently I had the opportunity to chat with Niani Tolbert, founder of the Hire Black initiative. What started as a Juneteenth commitment to provide resume review sessions for 19 black women has quickly evolved into large-scale allyship development among hundreds of recruiters and thousands of applicants. 

At this point in our history, companies are earnestly taking a hard look at their processes to identify where systematic exclusion is present. In this video, Niani provides practical ideas that recruiters and interviewers can implement TODAY to amplify diversity and inclusion in their hiring processes.

Niani also makes an exciting, first-time announcement in regards to the future of the Hire Black initiative!

Diversity efforts have become formulaic over the years. Where is leadership missing the mark?

In the best cases, companies hire a diversity leader, afford the person no power or resources, and expect miracles. This knee-jerk reaction is both careless and, looking at the landscape today, makes little difference, says this D&I strategist.

Over three weeks ago, when we watched George Floyd with a knee on his neck, the video should have been shocking, appalling, angering, and many other adjectives to everyone, myself included. But yet, when countless white friends reached out to me to ask how I was feeling, my answer was simply, “I’m fine.”

Today is no different than any other day; I went to sleep Black, I woke up Black, and the day that George Floyd was killed was no different to me than last Tuesday or every other Friday. The difference is that my friends, and people around the world, finally noticed.

Nothing has changed—at least yet. And whether I put a period after “Nothing has changed” is up to us and the actions we take in the future.

Simply Good: Celebrate Diversity and Autism Awareness

I love the month of April, which is known as Celebrate Diversity Month. As you may know, honoring diversity is kind of my thing, so when there’s an entire month focused on celebrating diversity, I want to dance in the street.

April also gives us the opportunity to participate in Autism Awareness Month. Neurodiversity is finding itself increasingly in the limelight as we learn more about autism spectrum disorder (ASD), as well as how we can support those who live with the diagnosis every day.

Given the current COVID-19 crisis and stay-at-home orders, we can’t mark these occasions with the usual schedule of events. Instead, we can commit to becoming better educated. Learning more about the symptoms and realities of ASD, as well as identifying where in our workplaces or social circles we are lacking the benefits of diversity — these are the best ways to celebrate.

To that end, below are a few encouraging stories to get you started.

Diversity Isn’t A Thing, It’s An Action

Last month, I attended the Association for Talent Development International Conference and Exhibition. I wasn’t managing the conference or its speakers as I’ve done for several conferences over the last eight years, nor was I even speaking or coaching professionals. I was an attendee, which allowed me to soak up the knowledge and work on my own professional learning and development.

As I listened to two of the keynote speakers, Barack Obama and Marcus Buckingham, I noticed common themes. Prefacing them was an introduction by chairwoman Tara Deakin, whose words struck me as insightful and sparked my idea for this article.

From Diversity to Inclusion: Three Strategies to Become an Employer of Choice

I recently saw the movie Black Panther along with millions of other people, and I came to the conclusion that many of them did: Women, and in this case, black women, are strong, wise and not to be messed with. So why does it seem like Corporate America is missing the memo?

Three Ways to Succeed in Hiring a More Diverse Workforce

Misguided and culturally insensitive blunders such as the racially insensitive Pepsi commercial with Kendall Jenner, Google’s disgruntled engineer intensifying male tech industry bias, the egregious casting decision in the movie Ghost in the Shell with whites playing Asians, and the complexity of L’Oréal firing a transgender black woman after her comments about race—all of these highlight the need for companies to incorporate diversity into their conversations at work.

A recent financial study of 1,000 large companies by McKinsey & Co. found that the more diverse the management, the higher the profits, compared with companies composed of less diversity. Companies in the top 25% with the most ethnic executives outperformed other firms with profits 33% higher than those in the bottom 25% with fewer ethnic workers. Firms more inclusive of women in management showed 21% more revenue than those with fewer women in executive roles.