Tag: HIRING

Stacey A. Gordon Talks With Erica Moore-Burton, Esq.

This week I had the chance to talk with Erica Moore-Burton, Esq., founder of Round Hill Legal Search, a Los Angeles legal services placement firm. For more than 16 years, Erica and her team have connected a vast network of legal firms with highly-qualified candidates to fill a wide range of legal positions.

In this video, Erica discusses the specific challenges that underrepresented minorities, especially women of color, face in the legal services industry. She also provides a fresh and innovative approach to the interview process, one that enables candidates to present their best selves without battling misconceptions before they even sit down.

Many firms are looking more closely at their employment metrics and how to retain diverse individuals, but the work of increasing awareness and changing perspectives is ongoing. I believe that there’s something different about the current environment, that the call for diversity and inclusion is resonating more than before. When people look back on this moment in history, what will they say about your company’s response?

From Diversity to Inclusion: Three Strategies to Become an Employer of Choice

I recently saw the movie Black Panther along with millions of other people, and I came to the conclusion that many of them did: Women, and in this case, black women, are strong, wise and not to be messed with. So why does it seem like Corporate America is missing the memo?

Three Ways to Succeed in Hiring a More Diverse Workforce

Misguided and culturally insensitive blunders such as the racially insensitive Pepsi commercial with Kendall Jenner, Google’s disgruntled engineer intensifying male tech industry bias, the egregious casting decision in the movie Ghost in the Shell with whites playing Asians, and the complexity of L’Oréal firing a transgender black woman after her comments about race—all of these highlight the need for companies to incorporate diversity into their conversations at work.

A recent financial study of 1,000 large companies by McKinsey & Co. found that the more diverse the management, the higher the profits, compared with companies composed of less diversity. Companies in the top 25% with the most ethnic executives outperformed other firms with profits 33% higher than those in the bottom 25% with fewer ethnic workers. Firms more inclusive of women in management showed 21% more revenue than those with fewer women in executive roles.

Hiring for Skills? A Novel Concept Indeed.

Microsoft announced they are working to accelerate a “skills-based labor market” and immediately I wondered what companies have been hiring for previously, if not for skills. I’m sure those of you who have applied for a job again and again, only to be rejected or ignored, have wondered the same thing. 

The New York Times reporting of the subject clarifies that in this ‘new’ way of looking at job applicants, “skills can be emphasized over traditional hiring filters like college degrees, work history and personal references.” From a recruiting perspective, I still believe in personal references because hearing first-hand from someone who has witnessed or benefited from your skills is extremely valuable when evaluating a candidate. 

A Simple Solution to Diversity: Start with People

LinkedIn recently asked CEO’s to share insights about diversity and it brought me back to a discussion I had with the Los Angeles Business Journal when I was asked to join their inaugural Diversity & Inclusion Summit happening next month. We discussed the fact that many companies know they need to do something about diversity but they don’t know what that something is. And they don’t know how to begin. 

And that is how initiatives like blind hiring get started. Blind hiring is the attempt to counter the phenomena of hiring managers and recruiters choosing candidates with a similar demographic background as their own by removing identify information like the candidate’s name and education background or conducting anonymous interviews through voice-masking technology.

How to make age less of a factor in your job search

I was reading an article about age bias and discrimination with the premise that new research shows it’s harder to get hired when you’re older and my first thought was, “this isn’t new.” People have been battling this problem for decades and it gets worse when the economy dips because there are fewer jobs to go around. But I guess they meant to say the new research confirms the bias so I won’t nitpick.

When I was recruiting I could guess the age of a person by their work history. That’s the biggest and most obvious way to do it. Candidates want to demonstrate their experience so they put all of it in their resume. All 34 years! But there’s no need because you only need to show 10-15 years of work history in your resume. Anything older than that probably won’t be relevant to the job anyway.