Tag: Inclusion

Stacey Talks Political Correctness with LaVada English

LaVada English and I took time this week to have a comfortable conversation about uncomfortable conversations. LaVada is the owner of L English Consulting, a coaching and consulting firm that helps organizations develop cultural transformation strategies. In this episode, LaVada and I talk about political correctness, the power of the media, and how organizations can approach real change to build a legacy worth leaving.

In the current climate, honest discussions about race and diversity are being quickly dismissed for fear of “getting too political.” However, these issues are not of a political nature, but a human one. LaVada delves into how the media not only propagates this divide, but also intentionally uses it to deflect focus from the real issues. We also exchange ideas about how to develop a questioning attitude when it comes to what we see, enabling us to, “think above the fray.”

Finally, we talk diversity and inclusion in the workplace, highlighting key questions that organizational leaders should ask themselves long before bringing in a D&I consultant, and why it’s important to know and understand our country’s history with racism. As 2020 finds us repeating behaviors and responses from the 1960s, LaVada calls us to the mat with this challenge: Are we going to allow ourselves to go back to sleep when we have an opportunity to seek greater understanding?

Stacey A. Gordon Talks Diversity, Inclusion and Careers With Creighton Taylor

This week I was joined by Creighton Taylor, founder and CEO of Guided Compass, a technology platform that he fondly refers to as “eHarmony for students and employers.”

Creighton and the Guided Compass team have developed a systematic approach that matches students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds with resources, tools, and opportunities in a vast array of industries. 

Never before has there been a better time for people to make their own path. Unfortunately, issues of access still create a chasm between individuals and the means to do just that. In this interview, Creighton and I discuss how Guided Compass and other organizations are working to bridge that gap by providing tools and resources (often free or low-cost) to help people upskill and enter the career path of their choosing. 

Creighton also shares a practical experiment that he believes will not only help companies understand the foundational benefits of a diverse workforce, but will also provide valuable data that helps other businesses and industries move forward in developing a culture of trust and inclusion in their own workplaces.

Stacey A. Gordon Talks With Guest Niani Tolbert

Recently I had the opportunity to chat with Niani Tolbert, founder of the Hire Black initiative. What started as a Juneteenth commitment to provide resume review sessions for 19 black women has quickly evolved into large-scale allyship development among hundreds of recruiters and thousands of applicants. 

At this point in our history, companies are earnestly taking a hard look at their processes to identify where systematic exclusion is present. In this video, Niani provides practical ideas that recruiters and interviewers can implement TODAY to amplify diversity and inclusion in their hiring processes.

Niani also makes an exciting, first-time announcement in regards to the future of the Hire Black initiative!

Diversity efforts have become formulaic over the years. Where is leadership missing the mark?

In the best cases, companies hire a diversity leader, afford the person no power or resources, and expect miracles. This knee-jerk reaction is both careless and, looking at the landscape today, makes little difference, says this D&I strategist.

Over three weeks ago, when we watched George Floyd with a knee on his neck, the video should have been shocking, appalling, angering, and many other adjectives to everyone, myself included. But yet, when countless white friends reached out to me to ask how I was feeling, my answer was simply, “I’m fine.”

Today is no different than any other day; I went to sleep Black, I woke up Black, and the day that George Floyd was killed was no different to me than last Tuesday or every other Friday. The difference is that my friends, and people around the world, finally noticed.

Nothing has changed—at least yet. And whether I put a period after “Nothing has changed” is up to us and the actions we take in the future.

From Diversity to Inclusion: Three Strategies to Become an Employer of Choice

I recently saw the movie Black Panther along with millions of other people, and I came to the conclusion that many of them did: Women, and in this case, black women, are strong, wise and not to be messed with. So why does it seem like Corporate America is missing the memo?

Three Ways to Succeed in Hiring a More Diverse Workforce

Misguided and culturally insensitive blunders such as the racially insensitive Pepsi commercial with Kendall Jenner, Google’s disgruntled engineer intensifying male tech industry bias, the egregious casting decision in the movie Ghost in the Shell with whites playing Asians, and the complexity of L’Oréal firing a transgender black woman after her comments about race—all of these highlight the need for companies to incorporate diversity into their conversations at work.

A recent financial study of 1,000 large companies by McKinsey & Co. found that the more diverse the management, the higher the profits, compared with companies composed of less diversity. Companies in the top 25% with the most ethnic executives outperformed other firms with profits 33% higher than those in the bottom 25% with fewer ethnic workers. Firms more inclusive of women in management showed 21% more revenue than those with fewer women in executive roles.

Pitting Inclusion Against Diversity

Deloitte has made the decision to phase out employee resource groups over the next 18 months. As you read that sentence, you’re probably wondering: “What’s the big deal?”

It’s a move that doesn’t only affect its nearly 250,000 employees worldwide. It potentially affects hundreds of thousands of employees outside of Deloitte because of its reputation as a company that knows what it’s doing when it comes to diversity. Deloitte has been, according to the press release, “a recognized pioneer in female promotion and social inclusion initiatives” and a DiversityInc Top 10 Company for Global Diversity. So now that it’s done something that pulls the foundation out from under the building blocks of diversity, I wonder what to do about it.

Grow Your Business with Diversity and Inclusion

Having diverse workers leads to greater success—but how can you attract and retain them?

Diversity in the workplace can always be improved—and it should, if only because it makes business sense. Having a diverse workforce can improve not only profitability, but innovation, customer relationships and employee retention.

According to a report by McKinsey & Company, a company with diverse employees is more likely to be more profitable and successful than those with less diversity. Specifically, a company is 15 percent more likely to turn a profit above the national average if a company has gender diversity, and 35 percent more likely if a company has racial and ethnic diversity. “The reason for that is because of the diversity of thought and ideas that comes from the diversity of experiences that people have,” explains Stacey Gordon, chief human capital consultant at training and consulting organization Rework Work.

John Iino, chief diversity officer at law firm Reed Smith, states that putting an emphasis on greater diversity and inclusion has directly benefited them. “[Diversity] really lends itself to better relationships with clients because you have some common values,” he shares. As the world becomes more interconnected, issues of diversity rise to the forefront, and many companies are taking note. “We see so many of our clients supporting and embracing diversity,” Iino adds. “We’re able to make stronger connections with them—that’s obviously important as a business.”

 

A Simple Solution to Diversity: Start with People

LinkedIn recently asked CEO’s to share insights about diversity and it brought me back to a discussion I had with the Los Angeles Business Journal when I was asked to join their inaugural Diversity & Inclusion Summit happening next month. We discussed the fact that many companies know they need to do something about diversity but they don’t know what that something is. And they don’t know how to begin. 

And that is how initiatives like blind hiring get started. Blind hiring is the attempt to counter the phenomena of hiring managers and recruiters choosing candidates with a similar demographic background as their own by removing identify information like the candidate’s name and education background or conducting anonymous interviews through voice-masking technology.

Equal Pay Day Isn’t Equal: Here’s How Employers Can Address the Wage Gap

Equal Pay Day is the symbolic day dedicated to raising awareness of the gender pay gap. The date changes each year because it symbolizes how far into the year women must work to earn what men earned in the previous year. The exact day differs by year and by country, but what the day fails to represent is the huge wage gap for women of color.

Let’s be clear, it is deplorable that it takes more than 3 months into the next year for women to earn what men earned the prior year, based upon a $0.20 difference in earnings, but for woman of color, our deficit is far greater. Equal pay day for African American women is in August and for Latina women it doesn’t come until November. Women represent nearly 50% of the U.S. workforce so with increasing numbers of families relying on women’s paychecks for their livelihood, we must acknowledge and address the wage gap for the sake of our financial stability.