Tag: Talent

Stacey A. Gordon First Guest on New DEI Podcast

This week I had the opportunity to be interviewed by Eliza Blanchard, the Learning and Development content manager for the Association of Talent Development (ATD). I was asked to be the inaugural guest for their new diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) podcast, a monthly program designed to feature conversations with various DEI experts to advance the work being done in the DEI field.

During our conversation, I was able to share a bit of my background, including one of the catalytic events that shifted my career path from recruiting to DEI consulting. We also discussed my Unconscious Bias course, but with the caveat that while education and awareness of our unconscious biases is important, it can’t be the end of the conversation. Education and awareness are fruitless if they aren’t followed by action, which is why I also shared a few things that hiring managers can do right now to reduce bias in their process, as well as what talent development managers can do to encourage those recruiters to sharpen and improve the way they craft job descriptions and define the “must-haves” for any position.

Check out the interview. As always, I’d love to hear your feedback!

Diversity Isn’t A Thing, It’s An Action

Last month, I attended the Association for Talent Development International Conference and Exhibition. I wasn’t managing the conference or its speakers as I’ve done for several conferences over the last eight years, nor was I even speaking or coaching professionals. I was an attendee, which allowed me to soak up the knowledge and work on my own professional learning and development.

As I listened to two of the keynote speakers, Barack Obama and Marcus Buckingham, I noticed common themes. Prefacing them was an introduction by chairwoman Tara Deakin, whose words struck me as insightful and sparked my idea for this article.

Three Ways to Succeed in Hiring a More Diverse Workforce

Misguided and culturally insensitive blunders such as the racially insensitive Pepsi commercial with Kendall Jenner, Google’s disgruntled engineer intensifying male tech industry bias, the egregious casting decision in the movie Ghost in the Shell with whites playing Asians, and the complexity of L’Oréal firing a transgender black woman after her comments about race—all of these highlight the need for companies to incorporate diversity into their conversations at work.

A recent financial study of 1,000 large companies by McKinsey & Co. found that the more diverse the management, the higher the profits, compared with companies composed of less diversity. Companies in the top 25% with the most ethnic executives outperformed other firms with profits 33% higher than those in the bottom 25% with fewer ethnic workers. Firms more inclusive of women in management showed 21% more revenue than those with fewer women in executive roles.

A Simple Solution to Diversity: Start with People

LinkedIn recently asked CEO’s to share insights about diversity and it brought me back to a discussion I had with the Los Angeles Business Journal when I was asked to join their inaugural Diversity & Inclusion Summit happening next month. We discussed the fact that many companies know they need to do something about diversity but they don’t know what that something is. And they don’t know how to begin. 

And that is how initiatives like blind hiring get started. Blind hiring is the attempt to counter the phenomena of hiring managers and recruiters choosing candidates with a similar demographic background as their own by removing identify information like the candidate’s name and education background or conducting anonymous interviews through voice-masking technology.

How to make age less of a factor in your job search

I was reading an article about age bias and discrimination with the premise that new research shows it’s harder to get hired when you’re older and my first thought was, “this isn’t new.” People have been battling this problem for decades and it gets worse when the economy dips because there are fewer jobs to go around. But I guess they meant to say the new research confirms the bias so I won’t nitpick.

When I was recruiting I could guess the age of a person by their work history. That’s the biggest and most obvious way to do it. Candidates want to demonstrate their experience so they put all of it in their resume. All 34 years! But there’s no need because you only need to show 10-15 years of work history in your resume. Anything older than that probably won’t be relevant to the job anyway.